Electronic Device One-Pager

Top Electronic Device Excuses

(Click to enlarge)

Here are some of the more common remarks when I attempt to confiscate an electronic device in class.

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Guided Self- Correction

guided self correction

I went to a Boys Town training earlier this month and started putting some of the strategies into comics to better remember them. Here is one of the comics, entitled “Guided Self-Correction.” I highly recommend the training, and have seen great improvement when I use them.

Grow Up

mad dog

I guess comics are like jokes in that if you don’t “get it,” you lose the humor when it is explained. Whenever my husband doesn’t immediately “get it,” I write out an explanation in case others are confused, too. Here’s what’s supposed to be happening in today’s comic: The teacher in purple has taken a student into the hallway to discuss his “mad-dogging” in class. (“Mad-dogging” is staring aggressively at others to intimidate them or instigate a fight. It is a blatant show of disrespect meant to humiliate the other person.) She explains, “You’re growing up now. Adults don’t ‘mad-dog.'” As she is speaking to the student, another teacher (whom she obviously doesn’t care for) passes by and stares at her and the student. The teacher in purple confronts the one in red and asks, “What do you think you’re looking at?” and the other teacher challenges her by saying, “Not much.”

I wanted to illustrate the power we have as teachers of living as role models. If we tell students that adults don’t do certain things, then we should show them that adults don’t do those things. Students often ask me if teachers all like each other and I say, “HECK NO! But we must work together so even though we don’t always like each other, we do show respect for one another.”

Acceptable Behavior in a Meeting

meeting behavior

What would happen if teachers started to behave like students? Imagine what a meeting would look like if you started acting the way the student acted in class. We should start doing this to demonstrate why the behavior is unacceptable. There shouldn’t be any negative consequences, right?

Maybe It’s YOU…

mom and son phone

 

Maybe the problem with your child is actually YOU. Maybe you aren’t a very good parent. Perhaps you are a poor role model. Here’s a tip: if you yell at your child to stop yelling, hit your child to stop hitting, cuss at your child to stop cussing, etc., then maybe you should learn how to parent. Maybe you might actually discipline your child instead of giving in to his or her bratty, whiny demands. You may possibly be responsible for creating a monster. Maybe it’snot MY fault. Maybe it’s YOUR fault.